But the researchers wanted to know if open body language directly In a second experiment, they created profiles on a GPS-based dating app for three men and three women.In one set of profiles, the men and women were pictured in contractive positions — for example, by crossing their arms or hunching their shoulders.

Harvard Business School professor Amy Cuddy saw her now husband for the first time on Facebook.

She noticed his photo, she said in a recent talk at the 92Y in New York City, because he was positioned "in the most extreme 'power pose' imaginable." "Power pose" is a term that Cuddy coined in her 2012 TED Talk, and it describes an expansive posture that can make you feel more powerful and confident.

As the author of the first body language book for gay men, I'm often asked how male body language affects guy-on-guy dating. But to understand why certain postures, gestures and expressions make you more appealing to gay guys, you have to understand the 5 major principles of gay body language: The truth leaks out of our bodies like a pockmarked water pail.

As soon as we put a finger in one hole another one opens up.

In a follow-up experiment, the researchers had another group of people rate the profile photos on openness and dominance.

As it turns out, when people were rated high on openness, they were likely to be rated high on dominance, too.

In the other set of profiles, the same men and women were pictured in expansive positions, like holding their arms upward in a "V" or reaching out to grab something.

Results showed that people in expansive postures were selected more often than those in contractive postures.

If you cross your arms, for example, you might as well spray man-repellent on yourself. He turned his body toward me, made lots of eye contact, and directed most of the conversation to me.